4 Key Factors For Home Health Care Services

Home health care services should emphase the importance of improving life in everyday homes.

Linking with agencies or government services has a distinct impact on the quality of life for the person being cared for at home.

Developing quality care in individual lifes centres around topics of morality and social responsibility.

Nel Noddings who has authored  a book called “Starting At Home”, is one of the central figures in the contemporary discussion of ethics and moral education. Nodding argues that caring is a way of life, learned at home. This can be extended into a guide for social policy.

Tackling issues such as capital punishment, drug treatment, homelessness, mental illness, and abortion, Noddings inverts traditional philosophical priorities to show how an ethics of care can have profound and compelling implications on social and political thought and policy.

I have found this myself. In  caring for a downs son who is now an adult, for 30 years. I have taken the road less travelled and use phylosophical and ethical decisions to assist in improving the quality of care for my son at home.

So many people can impose their views onto a sometimes difficult situation. And yet in the end, I take time to be on my own and make the best ethical decision I can make at the time. Everything else comes secondary to that decision. Sometimes, family member imply that I have made it hard for myself. However, I sleep well at night knowing I am principle focused and not just going with the flow as so many Carers do. 

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The book “Starting At Home” describes an ideal world by outlining the environment of a loving home and family. The book asks us if we can expand what we have experienced at home into the broader social sphere in the community.

Noddings explores the conflict that characterised political ideology throughout the 20th century between independence and equality. She describes liberalism/independence to all is a problematic way to base social policy. Alternatively, the author believes attentive love in the house contributes to an acceptable reactivity that can be the basis for social policy.

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The author argues that, with attention on the person who may be socially isolated we can improve quality of life with at homecare given the right social support.

Noddings further notes that the issue of in home health care services should be driven by responsive policies that allow clinicians to adapt appropriately to the needs of many specific but different customers.

Noddings also advises that significant plans for family, career and public life should start in school education.

At home health care services links the connection between treatment for individuals and any debate for moral and social policy. Whilst stressing the significance of improving life in everyday homes, one can influence the potential function that social policy may play in this change.

Quality Of Care At Home

  • Communication

Contact with workers may lead to the problematic actions of certain clients (Hastings & Remington, 1994).

Common features in communication with carers/workers can be included in training and education.

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Non-verbal and verbal communication skills are used naturally in the home and in a family units.

Communications and communication styles need to be compatable with the client if you are a carer from an agency or family member as the main care giver.

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Carers and Care workers may not differ in the way they connect at home and/or at work.

 

Care workers and consumers utilise communicative interventions to a great degree.

Some workers have a willingness to utilise expressions, accessible and closed questions effectively other will not.

Eventually, the explanations why workers interact with consumers undoubtedly go beyond employees’ skills and contact knowledge.

Miscommunicartions can occur with auditory impairments, over stating the meanings of communication, and challenges to interpret the nonverbal actions of consumers as a way of connecting with people.

Communication both verbal and non verbal, written and oral, is a vital key to a happy interaction with carers and consumers. Clear communication and use of commonly understood language are integral to meeting
the expectations of all involved.

Good communication, creative thinking, problem-solving, the ability to adapt to people’s needs and a commitment to change are among the skills needed for successful engagement and participation.

Everyone, including staff and mental health consumers and carers engaged to contribute, should feel welcome and at ease to share their expertise. However, the skills it takes to navigate these processes may not come naturally to everyone, and in some cases, may need to be fostered.

For success, everyone involved in the process needs to be inclusive and committed to recognising and developing skills and knowledge. It is not enough to just give people a seat at the table. It takes time to develop trust and understanding in any relationship. The same is to be said for the Carer/consumer relationship.

Transport

Medical appointments, shopping, private, family activities need to continue while caring for your loved one. There is plenty to see. And even if you’ve given up car keys, getting where you need to go should be considerd.

Transportation services ensure secure, timely, and friendly transportation from A to B. It’s more than a pick-up service. Carers can help with getting ready, have some company, and ensure consumers are supported in every possible way.

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Transportation includes: Doctor’s appointments Shopping / barber appointments / escort to hospital and home pharmacy collection, social family activities. Every ride you take will be an opportunity rather than a chore.

Trusted carer’s supporting the consumer, will have the advantage of a close companionship everywhere you go.

A individual carer can choose when or where a consumer goes too. Medical Alert ID’s can be worn just in case of emergencies.

Motivation.

Lack of motivation can impact negatively on the individual’s participation in recovery or disability. Decreased participation and engagement during rehabilitation greatly influences the level of function gained, length of stay in the hospital, mood and discharge destination.

Motivation is the drive or reason that a patient has to participate in their rehabilitation. However,  motivation levels can be negatively affected by apathy and depression, which are commonly seen in the consumer population.

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Depression is a mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest.

Apathy is described as “reduced motivation to engage in activities or general lack of initiative”.

Strategies and Interventions For Motivation

There are some strategies and interventions that have been shown to help patients suffering from depression and apathy.

  • Therapeutic Connection

Clinicians can influence motivation through their manner, the level of support they offer to the patient and the level of their involvement as perceived by the patient. Developing rapport with the patient and being genuine in any interaction underpins therapeutic connectivity.

  • Goal-Setting

Motivation is enhanced when there are clear goals which are personally relevant and developed with mutual understanding, negotiation and interaction. Goals and therapy need to be personalised, functional and meaningful. Patients are less motivated if tasks are not meaningful to them. Describing goals using the patient’s language is as important as the development of the goal itself.

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It has been indicated that listening to music during neural recovery enhances focused attention and verbal memory.

  • Music Therapy

Collectively study findings provide evidence that music engages and facilitates a wide range of cognitive functions. There is indication that listening  to music during neural recovery enhances focused attention and verbal memory. Results were better when music most relevant to the individual was utilised for at least 60 minutes per day.

  • Cognitive Stimulation

    Enhancing perception, attention, comprehension, learning, remembering, problem-solving and reasoning are the goals of cognitive stimulation. Providing opportunities for social interactions with others including family, friends and pets (and incorporating them in their rehabilitation plan) will stimulate cognitive processes.

  • Person-Centred Care Planning

    Acknowledging the patient as a unique individual who is an expert on themselves underpins person-centredness. Providing choices through the provision of information and education may enable them to become more engaged and confident in decision-making processes.

Ascertaining the most likely cause for lack of motivation and disengagement in rehabilitation and recovery should determine the path of the treatment plan and the adoption of most effective interventions. Implementation of appropriate interventions decreases the risk of continued motivational impact on recovery, optimises functional independence and improves the patient’s quality of life post-discharge.

Willingness To Take Responsibility.

When consumers are in institutions, hospitals or group homes, their choice is often severely limited. Choices are made as simple as when to wake up, what to eat, or who to spend your time with. We need to ensure that there is sufficient community housing and resources so that the person in recovery or with a disability can exercise their right to make decisions, take chances, engage in and even succeed in the often frightening and uncertain outside world.

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Hope is essential to recovery. Every option involves failure or success. Over-protective, limiting opportunities for people, not allowing them to take risks or try new stuff, crushes hope. It can be seen in many individuals long institutionalised or hospitalised. This can also lead to learned helplessness, sometimes more crippling than the disease itself (Petersen, Maier & Seligman, 1995). By promoting risk responsibility and encouraging people to determine and take chances, service providers help combat learned helplessness and foster self-esteem, self-respect, confidence, hope, and recovery.

 

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