5 Goals For Better Mental Health

With the support of your doctor or naturopath, better mental health can be achieved. You can develop strategies to help you feel in control of your situation. Stress does not discriminate on age or gender, with both men and women of any’ age feeling the effects of stress at some time or another.

However, what is stressful for one person may not be’stressful for another, as everybody reacts to stress in different ways. In fact, stress can be so ingrained’ in your daily life, that it may feel ‘normal’. Nevertheless, it is important not to underestimate the impact that stress may have on your physical and mental well being.

Working with a Natural Healthcare Practitioner who understands the effects of stress, and who can identify and provide strategies for your specific needs, will help you increase your tolerance to stress and reduce its impact on your body and mind.

better mental health

Setting Goals to Improve Mental Wellbeing

Setting goals gives life direction, boosts motivation and increases self-confidence. Goals, whether big or small, set to be achieved in a week or a year, are significant signposts on your way to health and well being. That said, goals should be set to give you the greatest chance of success.

Your Practitioner may have a system to help you set some weekly personal goals. Alternately, you and your Practitioner can use the tips below to formulate some achievable goals that will help you to reduce the impact of stress on your well being. Once agreed upon, write these in a Personal Wellbeing Journal.

better mental health

A commonly used goal-setting method uses the ‘SMART’ approach:

  • Firstly, find you’re ‘why’– why do you want to achieve your goal? Then ask yourself What? Where, When, Who, Which. Detailed specific goals are more likely to be achieved. Your goal and so know you have achieved it?
  • Measurable: Make your measurement something you can write down each day in your journal to track your progress.
  • Attainable: Once you identify what is important to you, consider what your challenges might you find? How will you overcome them? Do not shrink your goal to accommodate your attitudes. Aim to grow and expand your attitudes and beliefs to achieve your goal.
  • Realistic: Goals Need To Be Realistic. Be sure you are both willing and able to achieve your goal, even if it will take time.
  • Timely

What Does Stress Feel Like to You? The Many Faces of Stress

Stress can manifest in many ways and is different for each individual. You may identify with one or a combination of these different presentations.

Nervous tension and anxiety: Frequent and persistent tension and anxiety may manifest as excessive fear and worry, restlessness, tightening of the chest, racing heartbeat, and in extreme cases panic attacks. This negatively impacts the quality of life and normal day-to-day functioning.

Wired and tired: When stress is ongoing, your brain may perceive this as an ongoing threat, mounting a stress response to keep you alert or ‘wired’. This can reduce your ability to relax and wind-down, resulting in feeling not only wired but tired too – a sensation of being unable to switch-off in spite of being exhausted.

Exhausted and flat: In some individuals, exposure to ongoing stress may physically change the way their brain is able to respond. In these circumstances, the person is left feeling both physically and mentally exhausted, affecting performance at work and in everyday life.

Low mood: Ongoing stress can lead to structural changes to brain tissues, changing the way the brain functions. This can affect the activity of brain chemicals leading to feelings of poor mood.

Emotional: In many people, the effects of ongoing stress impacts their resilience. This may manifest as feelings of overwhelm, vulnerability, and lead to teary, weepy moments.

Insomnia: Stress can negatively impact sleep quality and quantity. This may manifest as an inability to unwind and fall asleep due to ruminating thoughts about your day, frequent waking, and/or feeling unrefreshed upon waking.

What Drives Stress?

Stress acts to motivate and sharpen your focus in situations where immediate action is required. The greater the intensity or urgency of the situation, the greater your stress response will be. For example, if you are faced with danger, your body switches on your acute stress response (also called the ‘flight or fight’ response) to give you a burst of energy and to help you deal with the danger by either running away or fighting back.

However, in the modern world, with emotional triggers seemingly around every corner, many people are faced with ongoing stressors, such as work deadlines, being stuck in traffic, endless emails, and negative news stories. In response to stress, your body releases the hormone cortisol – a chemical that allows you to stay in an active, attentive state for long periods of time in order to handle the stress at hand.

Chronic stress strongly affects every system in your body, with ongoing or poorly managed stress increasing the risk of experiencing potential health consequences.

better mental health

Stress may affect:

  • Mental well being and mood
  • Sleeping patterns (e.g. your ability to fall asleep and stay asleep)
  • Energy levels
  • Digestive function
  • Cardiovascular function, such as your heart rate and blood pressure; and
  • Reproductive hormones

It is important to manage your stressors in addition to your physical response to stressful situations in order to ensure balance and health are maintained.

Everyone is unique in how they respond to snd experience stress. Your practitioner will help you to identify the causes of your stress. but also the impact stress may be having on you physically and/or mentally that may not be obvious. This may include;

  1. Inflammation and infection
  2. Oxidative Stress  – stress can destroy brain cells.
  3. Gut disturbances
  4. Weight Management
  5. Poor Sleep

Your doctor can assess and prioritize all the above stress contributors and may recommend nutritional and herbal support, detoxification and weight management programs, diet, and lifestyle intervention specific to your needs.

Here is another great article in care services at home. 4 Key Factors For Home Health Care Services

10 Key Steps to Eating Healthy

General Nutritional Guidelines

10 key steps to eating healthy include small and simple steps we can take with our diet that can help us feel more alive with energy and life. Whole, unprocessed food provides our bodies with the nutrients it requires to function at its best for the healthiest life possible.

10 Key Steps to Eating Healthy

1. Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables is included in the key steps to eating healthy. Try to eat 7 serves of different fruits and vegetables each day and aim for 40 or more different plant foods each week. This includes nuts, seeds, fruits, vegetables, and healthy seed grains like quinoa and buckwheat. The more plant food variety we have in our diet, the better the health of the microbiome, and the more antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals we have to keep our cells fully functioning. Eat fresh organic produce as much as possible.

If you can’t afford organic foods then wash your fruit and vegetables well with a fruit and veggie wash or scrub with water and vinegar to remove the pesticide residue. Testing has shown that organic foods are more than 50 times higher in vitamins, minerals, and anti-oxidants’. Eat mostly raw or lightly cooked vegetables.

Either eat raw or steam, aiming to maintain the crispiness and color. When the weather is cooler, it is important to include more cooked foods as raw foods are very cooling on the body and can cause fatigue.

2. Eat wholegrain grains and cereals. If you want to eat bread, limit to 1-2 slices per day and make sure they are whole and unprocessed such as rye, spelt, Kamut, and pumpernickel bread. Try using brown rice or quinoa instead of refined white rice or cook half and half. Eat cereals made from whole grains, nuts, and seeds, high in fiber, and no added sugar.

Steps to eating healthy

3. Include a variety of lean meat, fish, poultry, or vegetarian alternatives in your steps to eating healthy. Free-range, grass-fed meat is more nutrient-dense and better tasting. Free-range roaming chickens are healthier as they are lower or free from chemicals. Eat large ocean fish only 1-2 per week (as they can accumulate toxins and heavy metals), focus more on smaller fish such as mackerel and herring 3-4 times per week. Include at least 5 vegetarian meals per week eg quiche, veggie burgers, quinoa salad/bake. Choose organic animal foods as much as possible as it will be free from chemicals.

4. Dairy foods and alternatives (optional) a Use natural yogurts with probiotics eg vaalia (not Yakult, too much sugar), you can add the fruit yourself if you want, for flavor. When selecting soy milk choose those made from non-GM, whole soya beans, and use in moderation. If you don’t have an intolerance to dairy small amounts of milk, cheese and yogurt are okay in your diet.Steps to eating healthy

If you do have an intolerance to dairy substitutes with goat’s milk, coconut milk, calcium-fortified soy, and rice milk, or nut and seed milk e.g. almond and oat milk.

5. Drink plenty of water. Water is required to keep your body hydrated and to flush water-soluble toxins from the body.

You should drink at least 3 liters of filtered water each day, plus an extra half to one liter for every hour of exercise/heavy sweating.

Water keeps our cells healthy and fluid, which means nutrients can enter efficiently and waste products can leave the cell properly.

Keeping hydrated also helps with brain function and hormonal balance and protects our kidneys.

Filtered water is a better option to reduce the exposure to chemicals that are often added to our water.

These chemicals in the water can bind to vitamins and minerals in our blood and excrete them, which can lead to deficiencies.

6. Limit unhealthy fats including foods that have been deep-fried, a packet of chips, cheap chocolate, vegetable oils such as canola, and rice bran.

7. Use healthy oils every day. Use cold-pressed virgin olive oil or coconut oil for cooking. Flaxseed, avocado, and nut oils make great oils for salad dressing, these oils can’t be heated. Increase intake of Omega 3 oils eg fish oils, flaxseed oil, hemp seed oil, chia seeds, and hemp seeds. Add the oils to your breakfast, salads, veggies.

Omega 3 fats are important for hormones and brain, skin, and User health and are naturally anti-inflammatory.

8. Limit alcohol intake. Studies have found that no amount of alcohol is actually okay for the body. If you would like to enjoy alcohol, limit your intake to 3-4 standard drinks/week.

9. Divide your meal up to get a balance of macronutrients. Divide your plate with a palm-sized portion of protein plus 3 handfuls of vegetables or salads. If you want a larger meal, add more vegetables.

A vegetarian meal could include a combination of eggs, beans, nuts, seeds, lentils, chickpeas, tofu, tempeh, cheese, grains, seaweed, sprouts, quinoa, hummus, and miso as well as vegetable and salads.

Steps to eating healthy

10. Eat small and regular meals if you have a blood sugar issue. If you get dizzy or irritable between meals try eating more fat and fewer carbohydrates such as potato, rice, pasta, cereals. Eat 4-6 small meals rather than 2-3 large meals. When we eat more fat, fewer carbohydrates, and moderate protein, we should be able to go from one meal to the next without snacking. This is a sign of a good blood sugar balance.

Other Steps To Include In Eating Healthy

11. Food breaks. Ideally, our bodies need 3-4 hours break between meals and 3-4 hours break between dinner and bed. Studies show this improves sleep, mood, digestive capacity, immunity, and general wellbeing.

12. Minimize your toxic load a toxins/chemicals in our environment, in our food and drink and what we put on our body affects our hormones, the quality of our cells (therefore our whole body), and can compromise our energy, focus, and mood. Take care to choose chemical-free shampoo, toothpaste, and moisturizer in particular.

Steps to eating healthy

When our skin is hot ie in the shower and we create friction ie brushing our teeth, our pores are more open and can more readily absorb toxins. You can start by replacing 1 item at a time as you finish with them. Also, avoid heating food in plastic as when it is warm, the plastic will release hormone-disrupting chemicals into the food. Try heating in glass containers.

13. Detox! Everybody needs a cleanse and detox 1 -2 times per year to keep our body healthy and clean so we can lead the best life possible.

Enjoy reading this article? Here is another informative article.  4 Key Factors For Home Health Care Services

Prepared Meals Delivered Home

Prepared Meals Delivered Home

When you are recovering from illness or have a disability that prevents you from shopping, there are healthy meal options.

I have discovered a dynamic company called Youfoodz.

Youfoodz is a home delivery service in major metropolitan areas throughout Australia.

Youfoodz also stocks great nutritional meals in many stores including IGA and major supermarkets like  Aldi, Coles and Woolworths.

Nutrition is essential to your recovery and Youfoodz serves you well in that way.

If you wish to find out more about home care please read 4 Key Factors For Home Health Care Services.

Prepared Meals Delivered Home

There are so many fade diet, it become quite an exercise to find what’s right for you, your body, you likes and dislikes.

Youfoodz offer nutritional meals for busy people and for weight loss.

Youfoodz started in Australia in 2012. From it’s inception, the emphasis was creating prepackaged meals that were nutritous and healthy.  The fresh ready made meals can also include healthy snack and drinks. The company now has over 3000 stockists and continues to deliver at homes in major metropolitan areas in Australia.

If you are wondering how does the food stay fresh, then you can relax, as the company sources local fresh produce. The food is cooked packaged and delivered straight to your door.

The food is vaccum sealed via “Modified Atmosphere Packaging” system which removes oxygen from the meals allowing the food to stay fresh. Meal expiry is  inclusive of the day of delivery.

Only the ready to eat meals can be frozen for up to 3 months. It is recommended not to freeze the fish or salad meals.

There are vegetarian prepared meals delivered home  too.

If you are ever unhappy with the service you can compain through the online form.  The company takes pride and the utmost care when it comes to safety with food and health. From personal hygiene for food handling to packaging and delivery, the company’s safety standards at maintianed.

Youfoodz commit to taking your complaints seriously.

Unfortunaley, the company does not do custum made meals, due to the large volume of production.

However, one great feature of this service is that packaging is 100% recyclable including meal sleeves, snack packaging and drink containers.

Prepared Meals Delivered Home

More recently Youfoodz is marketing and catering for larger meals. They usually take about 2 minutes to heat.

Another service that YouFoodz offers is Grocery Essentials.

This program offers seasonal selection of fresh fruit and vegetables. This is subject to change without notification so they can provide the highest quality produce.

Meat, dairy and egg product are Australian made. However some fruit may be imported if not supplied in Australia.

Minimum Oders are $49.

If you wish to order head straight to the menu page at their website, select what you like on the menu. Then you just can head to the online checkout to complete the order.

The company currently takes Credit Cards, Afterpay, Zip and Paypal.

You can set up recurring orders and you do not have to even sign a contract.

The Weight Loss Refresh program has been successful since inception.  Its not a diet, challenge or cleanse. These meals are potioned controlled and made simple with fresh, delicious and convenient meals under 350 calories per meal. There is is no lock in contract. You can order each week or set up a recurring order for week, fortnighly or monthly deliveries.

The company has a motto “Best meals delivered or its free”.Prepared Meals Delivered Home

Youfoodz has been crowned Australia’s #1 Healthy Meal Delivery Service from Canstar Blue + Australia’s Best Food Delivery Service from ProductReview 3 YEARS in a row!

Forget frozen – Youfoodz uses nothing but fresh-picked produce & top-quality protein for our ready-to-eat classics, next day delivery for metro areas, fresh sandwiches & more.

Youfoodz offers variety as well via an ever-changing menu of 100+ meals, snacks & juices can be delivered to your door or found at ~3000 stockists Australia-wide, including Coles, Aldi, Drakes, IGA, Night Owl, BP, FoodWorks, Good Life & so many more.

Nutrition and Mental Health

In the past, research on dietary nutrition was often focused on adults and mental health.

We recognise that adequate eating is related to improved mental health effects, whereas a bad diet highly likely lead to a depressed mood and anxiety.

Emerging studies focused on children and young people has, however, also established a link between deficient diets and suicide. Regional Australia has some of the highest rates of youth suicide in the world.  It also has low socio economic levels and significant social problem.

Lets look at dietry requirements for children and mental health.

Poor nutrition can lead to;

  • poor concerntration and memory
  • low mood
  • hyperactivity and agressive behaviour

Mental health conditions, including depression and anxiety, are associated with nutrient deficiencies (we know that fruits or vegetables , grains, fish, lean red meats and olive oils are rich in important nutrients, including folate, magnesium, vitamins and zinc, all of which influence body and brains and mood regulations).

Dietary choices is not always a option. Sometimes there is not enough food for many Australian households due to issues like joblessness and hunger. Food deprivation can cause lower academic success, stress, depression , anxiety, violence and conflicts with other people. Insecurity of food can contribute to eating disorders.

The Australian Dietary Guidelines recommend that we all increase our intake of fruit and vegetables and reduce foods high in sugar, salt and fat.

However, changing lifestyles and increased access to processed foods mean many children and young people fail to meet these recommendations. Less than 1% of children and young people aged two to 18 years consume the recommended amount of vegetables each day.

Here are some references for further reading on this topic.

Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). (2017). Australian Health Survey: Consumption of Food Groups from the Australian Dietary Guidelines, 2011-12. Canberra: ABS. Retrieved from http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/
4364.0.55.012main+features12011-12.

Jacka, F. N., Kremer, P. J., Berk, M., de Silva-Sanigorski, A. M., Moodie, M., Leslie, E. R., & Swinburn, B. A. (2011). A prospective study of diet quality and mental health in adolescents. PloS one, 6(9), e24805.

Jyoti, D. F., Frongillo, E. A., & Jones, S. J. (2005). Food insecurity affects school children’s academic performance, weight gain, and social skills. The Journal of Nutrition, 135(12), 2831-2839.

National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). (2013) Australian Dietary Guidelines. Canberra: NHMRC. Retrieved from https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/guidelines-publications/n55.

Tomlinson, D., Wilkinson, H., & Wilkinson, P. (2009). Diet and mental health in children. Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 14(3), 148-155.

Townsend, N., Murphy, S., & Moore, L. (2011). The more schools do to promote healthy eating, the healthier the dietary choices by students. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 65(10), 889-895.

 

Food Health Safety

Food Health Safety

Safe Food Handling Practices In The Kitchen.

There are many reasons families may mishandle foods.

Food Health SafetySome of the more common barriers to safe food handling are described below.

“When I make dinner, I have my routine. I really don’t have to think about it too much.”

Food preparation, for many, is a repeated or habitual behavior. The more often a task like preparing food is repeated, the more “automatic” it becomes—that is, less cognitive effort is needed.

Intervening to break this chain of events by introducing a new procedure (e.g., using soap to wash hands instead of just rinsing them, using a thermometer to judge doneness instead of just assessing color) is challenging.

Responsibility Deflection

“It’s not my responsibility.”

Some families feel food safety is the responsibility of others higher in the food safety chain who control food safety risks prior to food being offered for sale As a result, they deem food safety as not important in the home environment and may not accept their role in preventing foodborne illness in the home. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health

food health safety

Risky Preferences for Food Health Safety

“I enjoy eggs with a runny center.” “I prefer the taste of rare meat.”

These families are concerned the new behavior will  change the taste of foods and diminish their pleasure. This is important to consider given that taste is the number one driver of food choices.

food health safety

Cost: Benefit Miscalculations

“That takes too much time!” “It’s inconvenient.”

Some feel the time, effort, and resources needed to make the change are not reasonable or convenient. Foodborne illness often is mild and of short duration, thus many families may not be aware of its sometimes devastating and deadly outcomes when they (mis)calculate the value of safe food handling procedures.

Social Fears

“What would my family think if I checked their burgers with a thermometer?”

Individuals with the primary responsibility for preparing foods in their household indicate that they take great pride in their cooking. In addition, they highly rate the quality of the work done by those who prepare foods in their homes to ensure the safety of their food. Some household food preparers feel that new behaviors, like using thermometers to check cooking temperatures, would diminish the opinions others have of their skills as a cook.

Faulty Outcome Expectations

“I’ve always done it this way and haven’t gotten sick.”

These families o not perceive that the current way of behaving is problematic (or making them susceptible) to foodborne illness. They may fail to understand how emerging pathogens and changes in the food supply make what was once a safe behavior (e.g., eating raw eggs or rare burgers) a risky behavior. Compounding this problem is that few believe that home prepared foods are a likely cause of foodborne illness.

food health Safety

Optimistic Bias

“It won’t happen to me.

Nearly 6 out of 10 families believe their chances of getting foodborne illness are low. Some families believe that they have a small chance of getting a foodborne illness compared to others. This optimistic bias is positively linked with risky behaviors and neglects to take precautionary measures, which is related to increased incidence of accidents and foodborne illness.

Most (90%) report their personal risk of illness from eating food they prepared is low. But, when asked about the risk of others in their social group, only 41% thought these individuals had a low risk of illness from eating food they prepared. Rating one’s own risk as lower than others in one’s social group—those with whom an individual compares him or herself—is an indicator of low motivation to change precautionary behaviors.

Illusions of Control

“We take the necessary precautions in my home.”

Two-thirds believe they exert high levels of control over safe food handling when they prepare food. When asked what grade a food safety expert would give them for food preparation, service, and storage in their home, all but 2% gave themselves passing grades. When the family used a retail food establishment food safety evaluation checklist adapted for homes, scores were considerably lower. Scores were even lower when trained auditors evaluated home kitchens—the average grade was failing.

Making these results more disheartening is that participants in these home visit studies were aware that researchers would be coming to their home to observe and evaluate their kitchen practices.

How Can Health Professionals Help The Family Handle Food More Safely?

Health behavior change theories, such as the Health Belief Model, Theory of Planned Behavior, and Social Cognitive Theory, provide valuable roadmaps for identifying key constructs to address when aiming to effect behavior change.

Although thousands of studies demonstrate the usefulness of these theories in designing effective interventions for a wide array of health behaviors, including food safety, few food safety interventions have been theory based. Food safety education programs built on the constructs below have the potential to help families gain the  knowledge, skills, motivation, and confidence needed to handle foods more safely.

Boost Knowledge

For behaviors associated with Clean, Separate, Chill, and Cook, many families are aware of the food safety basics. Families also understand that “germs” can hurt them. However, many still have food safety knowledge gaps and their knowledge of safe food handling practices does not always correspond with reported use. This suggests a need to build consumer knowledge, activate existing knowledge, and motivate information application.

Highlight Responsibility

Their own responsibility than that of others in the food safety chain or believe their risk of foodborne illness is controlled by fate or luck. Some feel they have little responsibility because they believe most foodborne illnesses are caused earlier in the food safety chain or by retail food establishments. Helping families understand the magnitude of control they have in their own homes as food safety risk managers and finding motivators—such as helping them understand that by using a thermometer, loved ones are less likely become sick from undercooked meat or showing them how easy thermometers are to use—can help promote behavior change.

Heighten Recognition of Susceptibility and Severity of Outcomes

Engaging in health protective behaviors is associated with greater perceived susceptibility or beliefs in the likelihood of a negative health outcome and its severity. For example, those who Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10 4071 believe food poisoning is a personal threat eat fewer risky foods.  food health safetyPersonalizing risks can help get better understand their own foodborne illness susceptibility. Thus, interventions should help families learn who is at increased risk for foodborne illness as better knowledge of these groups predicts better compliance with safe food handling recommendations.

Emphasize Behavioral Control

Perceived behavioral control is a significant predictor of safe food handling intentions.

However, it is difficult to motivate families to change when they feel confident that they are already controlling foodborne illness risks in their kitchens. Tools that help families pinpoint problems in their own kitchen, such as home kitchen food safety self-assessments, could personalize the message and increase their awareness of problem spots. These tools also can clarify how current behaviors could be endangering their health and how simple changes can lower the danger level. Another tool is “recipe Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP)”—that is, teaching families to identify steps in a recipe that may increase food safety hazards and think ahead about how to resolve them.

Build Confidence

If families are worried about possible embarrassment of performing new behaviors, like using a cooking thermometer, improving attitudes toward the behavior and changing beliefs about how others in their social network perceive the behavior can build the confidence needed to motivate families to make changes. Social networks may influence a broad array of health-risk behaviors, especially among adolescents. Although few studies examining the role of social influences

on food safety behaviors could be located, studies of other health behaviors strongly suggest that utilizing social networks in food safety interventions could increase their effectiveness. In addition, working to shift social norms, such as by modeling thermometer use or other food safety behaviors on television programs can help build confidence (an example of a video clip that shifted social norms that may be familiar to readers is the “double” dipping” clip from a Seinfeld episode.

food health safety

Offer Cues to Action

Researchers have reported that families take food safety precautions only when they perceive a risk, such as when they handle raw poultry, fear they may give others food poisoning, or when others are watching. At other times, families may be acting out of habit and make food handling mistakes because they lack “cues to action”. Fein and colleagues use the analogy of driving a car—drivers are constantly taking protective actions in response to cues, such as the yellow stripe in the middle of the road or a stop sign. But, when making dinner, hazards are not visible (e.g., pathogens on the unwashed produce that are contaminating the counter and our hands) and there are few, if any, cues to remind us to practice safe food handling (e.g., use soap to wash hands or keep washed and unwashed produce separated).

Risk messages or handling instructions on food packages help cue some to change their behavior. In one study, the control group received a chicken salad recipe and the experimental group received the same recipe with a printed message encouraging them to take great care to avoid cross contaminating the salad by preventing raw meat juices from coming in contact with other ingredients and utensils. Salads made by the group receiving the cue had significantly less bacteria than those made by the control group, putting the experimental group at a four-fold lower relative risk of falling ill than the control group. Another study that involved preparing a chicken salad recipe found that only 57% of important hygiene measures (i.e., washing hands with soap and water, checking doneness with a thermometer) were used by participants.

Food Health Safety

food health safety

Adding food safety cues to food packages may be particularly effective given that nearly half of families indicate they commonly read cooking instructions on food packages. Placing soap dispensers in direct line of sight also helps improve hand washing. Adding endpoint cooking temperatures in educational materials and cookbooks are other cues to action. Printing washing instructions on reusable grocery bags could cue families to wash them.

These are some thing that can help improve food safety on the home.