3 Tips For Self Management Of Diabetes

Self management of diabetes

Self management of diabetes and glucose levels can be challenging sometimes. If you are frail, or if you take other medicines or have other health problems, you may be at greater risk of hypoglycemia.

It is recommended that your doctor reviews your targets on a regular basis.

They can help set blood glucose targets that will keep you safe.

The target blood glucose levels for people over 65 who are living independently is generally between 4 and 10 mmol/L. This range may increase to between 6 to 15 mmol/L if you take medication for your diabetes, become frail, have other health problems, or are at risk of falls.

Ask your doctor what targets you should be aiming for. Blood glucose meters and other devices used to help manage your diabetes need regular review, testing, and upgrading. Your diabetes educator or pharmacist may be able to help you with this.

Self management of diabetes

Healthy Tip – 1

Once you turn 65, ask your doctor to review your blood glucose targets regularly.

It is not uncommon for people with diabetes to have a high blood glucose level. Generally, a blood glucose level over 15mmol/L is considered hyperglycemia and should prompt you to think about why it could be high.

A high blood glucose level now and then is not a problem. However, if you get symptoms of hyperglycemia or your blood glucose levels to remain high for a few days, it is really important to contact your doctor.

There are several causes of hyperglycemia in people:

• too little insulin or diabetes medicine

• food intake not being covered adequately by insulin or medication

• decrease inactivity

• illness, infection or injury

• severe physical or emotional stress

• taking certain medications, in-particular oral steroids or steroid injections

• insulin pump not working properly.

If you have a blood glucose level over 15mmof/L and you are not sure what to do, or if you are becoming unwell, contact your doctor.

Healthy Tip  – 2

Self management of diabetes

As you get older you may find your hyperglycemia warning signs change. When you were younger, early warning symptoms of hyperglycemia may have included increased thirst, passing lots of urine, nausea, blurred vision, or dry mouth. As you get older your warning signs may become less obvious feel tired or confused or you may feel nothing at all. If you think that it might affect you, it is strongly recommended you discuss it with your doctor or diabetes educator.

When you are unwell, you need to take extra care. Your diabetes may become harder to manage when you are sick.

It can be really helpful to talk to your doctor or diabetes educator about what to do if you become sick before it happens. How you manage will depend on whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Your doctor or diabetes educator can help you write a plan for what to do if you become unwell. Make sure you give a copy of the plan to your family and friends, so they also know what to do.

Healthy Tip 3

If you talk to your doctor or diabetes educator now about a sick day plan, you will be prepared.

Keep your plan handy and make sure you give a copy to your family and friends.

Managing Your Physical Activity As You Get Older

The aging process, the complications of diabetes, and other health issues can result in physical limitations that have an impact on our lives. You may experience vision problems, hearing loss, have less physical energy and flexibility or be in pain.

Self management of diabetes

It is important to:

                        • have your feet checked every six months
                        • have your hearing tested every year”
                        • have your eyes tested every two’
                        • (or more often if advised), and

Let your doctor know if you have pain or feel sore or are uncomfortable in any part of your body.

Sometimes people think they are too old or frail to exercise but any increase in activity can make a difference to your health and well-being.

It is recommended that people over 65 years do at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity on most preferable days.

If you are already this active, keep going!

If you have not been this active or you have not exercised for a while, it is a good idea to talk to your doctor before you start.

Begin slowly and build up: for example, if you are aiming for 30 minutes of walking per day, start with 10 minutes once or twice a day. After two weeks, make it 15 minutes twice a day and you will have reached your goal of 30 minutes a day.

There are many ways you can keep active such as walking, gentle swimming, working in the garden, washing the car, dancing, or Tai Chi. Being physically active in the company of other people can be very enjoyable, and can help you to keep motivated and committed.

Try walking with a family member, friend, or neighbor, or see what senior classes your local council offers.

It is important to do a range of activities that include fitness, strength, flexibility and balance.

If you are not sure how these ”types of activities” or you are not sure what activity or how many days is preferable then it’s best you talk to your doctor or an exercise physiologist. They can help tailor a program just for you.

Managing Your Emotions

Significant life changes can put them at risk of anxiety and depression.

The future and bereavement can contribute to feelings of helplessness and depression.

Living with diabetes can also be tiring and worrying about you and your family .

Diabetes means you look after yourself every single day, with no breaks.

This constant pressure can take its toll and you may feel anxious or depressed.

Symptoms of anxiety and depression in older people are sometimes is not recognised because this can be seen as part of ‘growing old’.

It is important for you to talk to your doctor or other health professions about getting the right advice and support.

You can read about the kinds of issues that support services can help you in Key Factors For Home Health Care Services

Seek help if you:

  • feel sad, feel tired, sleep a lot or have daytime sleepiness
  • have trouble falling or staying asleep
  • have unexplained or aggravated aches and pains
  • are reluctant to be with friends, participate in activities or leave your home
  • lose weight or your appetite
  • Jack motivation or energy
  • have slowed movement or speech
  • neglect your personal care (such as skipping meals, forgetting your medicine or neglecting personal hygiene)
  • are frequently worried or have concerns about a number of things in your life including your health
  • have feelings of worthlessness or self-loathing
  • fixated on death or have thoughts of harming yourself or suicide.

Self management of diabetes

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Self management of diabetes

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Finally, I will summerise this article for you. Ask your doctor what targets you should be aiming for. Blood glucose meters and other devices used to help manage your diabetes need regular review, testing, and upgrading. Your diabetes educator or pharmacist may be able to help you with this. Keep active, maintain a healthy diet will a lot of fresh veggies. Keep active at the level you are comfortable with and aim for good mental health and balanced relationships.

10 Key Steps to Eating Healthy

General Nutritional Guidelines

10 key steps to eating healthy include small and simple steps we can take with our diet that can help us feel more alive with energy and life. Whole, unprocessed food provides our bodies with the nutrients it requires to function at its best for the healthiest life possible.

10 Key Steps to Eating Healthy

1. Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables is included in the key steps to eating healthy. Try to eat 7 serves of different fruits and vegetables each day and aim for 40 or more different plant foods each week. This includes nuts, seeds, fruits, vegetables, and healthy seed grains like quinoa and buckwheat. The more plant food variety we have in our diet, the better the health of the microbiome, and the more antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals we have to keep our cells fully functioning. Eat fresh organic produce as much as possible.

If you can’t afford organic foods then wash your fruit and vegetables well with a fruit and veggie wash or scrub with water and vinegar to remove the pesticide residue. Testing has shown that organic foods are more than 50 times higher in vitamins, minerals, and anti-oxidants’. Eat mostly raw or lightly cooked vegetables.

Either eat raw or steam, aiming to maintain the crispiness and color. When the weather is cooler, it is important to include more cooked foods as raw foods are very cooling on the body and can cause fatigue.

2. Eat wholegrain grains and cereals. If you want to eat bread, limit to 1-2 slices per day and make sure they are whole and unprocessed such as rye, spelt, Kamut, and pumpernickel bread. Try using brown rice or quinoa instead of refined white rice or cook half and half. Eat cereals made from whole grains, nuts, and seeds, high in fiber, and no added sugar.

Steps to eating healthy

3. Include a variety of lean meat, fish, poultry, or vegetarian alternatives in your steps to eating healthy. Free-range, grass-fed meat is more nutrient-dense and better tasting. Free-range roaming chickens are healthier as they are lower or free from chemicals. Eat large ocean fish only 1-2 per week (as they can accumulate toxins and heavy metals), focus more on smaller fish such as mackerel and herring 3-4 times per week. Include at least 5 vegetarian meals per week eg quiche, veggie burgers, quinoa salad/bake. Choose organic animal foods as much as possible as it will be free from chemicals.

4. Dairy foods and alternatives (optional) a Use natural yogurts with probiotics eg vaalia (not Yakult, too much sugar), you can add the fruit yourself if you want, for flavor. When selecting soy milk choose those made from non-GM, whole soya beans, and use in moderation. If you don’t have an intolerance to dairy small amounts of milk, cheese and yogurt are okay in your diet.Steps to eating healthy

If you do have an intolerance to dairy substitutes with goat’s milk, coconut milk, calcium-fortified soy, and rice milk, or nut and seed milk e.g. almond and oat milk.

5. Drink plenty of water. Water is required to keep your body hydrated and to flush water-soluble toxins from the body.

You should drink at least 3 liters of filtered water each day, plus an extra half to one liter for every hour of exercise/heavy sweating.

Water keeps our cells healthy and fluid, which means nutrients can enter efficiently and waste products can leave the cell properly.

Keeping hydrated also helps with brain function and hormonal balance and protects our kidneys.

Filtered water is a better option to reduce the exposure to chemicals that are often added to our water.

These chemicals in the water can bind to vitamins and minerals in our blood and excrete them, which can lead to deficiencies.

6. Limit unhealthy fats including foods that have been deep-fried, a packet of chips, cheap chocolate, vegetable oils such as canola, and rice bran.

7. Use healthy oils every day. Use cold-pressed virgin olive oil or coconut oil for cooking. Flaxseed, avocado, and nut oils make great oils for salad dressing, these oils can’t be heated. Increase intake of Omega 3 oils eg fish oils, flaxseed oil, hemp seed oil, chia seeds, and hemp seeds. Add the oils to your breakfast, salads, veggies.

Omega 3 fats are important for hormones and brain, skin, and User health and are naturally anti-inflammatory.

8. Limit alcohol intake. Studies have found that no amount of alcohol is actually okay for the body. If you would like to enjoy alcohol, limit your intake to 3-4 standard drinks/week.

9. Divide your meal up to get a balance of macronutrients. Divide your plate with a palm-sized portion of protein plus 3 handfuls of vegetables or salads. If you want a larger meal, add more vegetables.

A vegetarian meal could include a combination of eggs, beans, nuts, seeds, lentils, chickpeas, tofu, tempeh, cheese, grains, seaweed, sprouts, quinoa, hummus, and miso as well as vegetable and salads.

Steps to eating healthy

10. Eat small and regular meals if you have a blood sugar issue. If you get dizzy or irritable between meals try eating more fat and fewer carbohydrates such as potato, rice, pasta, cereals. Eat 4-6 small meals rather than 2-3 large meals. When we eat more fat, fewer carbohydrates, and moderate protein, we should be able to go from one meal to the next without snacking. This is a sign of a good blood sugar balance.

Other Steps To Include In Eating Healthy

11. Food breaks. Ideally, our bodies need 3-4 hours break between meals and 3-4 hours break between dinner and bed. Studies show this improves sleep, mood, digestive capacity, immunity, and general wellbeing.

12. Minimize your toxic load a toxins/chemicals in our environment, in our food and drink and what we put on our body affects our hormones, the quality of our cells (therefore our whole body), and can compromise our energy, focus, and mood. Take care to choose chemical-free shampoo, toothpaste, and moisturizer in particular.

Steps to eating healthy

When our skin is hot ie in the shower and we create friction ie brushing our teeth, our pores are more open and can more readily absorb toxins. You can start by replacing 1 item at a time as you finish with them. Also, avoid heating food in plastic as when it is warm, the plastic will release hormone-disrupting chemicals into the food. Try heating in glass containers.

13. Detox! Everybody needs a cleanse and detox 1 -2 times per year to keep our body healthy and clean so we can lead the best life possible.

Enjoy reading this article? Here is another informative article.  4 Key Factors For Home Health Care Services

Launch of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Campaign

by the Australia Government Site https://www.health.gov.au/news/launch-of-the-coronavirus-covid-19-campaign

A national campaign has launched to inform all Australians about the corona virus (COVID-19).

Date published:
14 March 2020
Type: News
Intended audience: General public

A national campaign has launched to inform all Australians about the corona virus (COVID-19).

The campaign aims to reduce the risk to individuals and families by enabling them to make informed decisions and to take up health recommendations.

The following communication material provides more information and tips to help you be prepared:

Videos

Coronavirus video – Good Hygiene Starts Here
Coronavirus video – Stay Informed
Coronavirus video – Recent Traveller
Coronavirus video – Help Stop The Spread

Print

Coronavirus – Print ads – Simple steps to stop the spread
Coronavirus – print ads – Recently travelled overseas
Coronavirus – print ads – Good hygiene is in your hands

Radio

Coronavirus – Radio – Simple steps to stop the spread
Coronavirus – Radio – Recently travelled overseas
Coronavirus – Radio – Good hygiene is in your hands
Coronavirus – Radio – Stay informed

Early reports suggest person-to-person transmission most commonly happens during close exposure to a person infected with COVID-19, primarily via respiratory droplets produced when the infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks. Droplets can land in the mouths, noses, or eyes of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs of those within close proximity.

Recent studies indicate that people who are infected but do not have symptoms likely also play a role in the spread of COVID-19. The contribution of small respirable particles, sometimes called aerosols or droplet nuclei, to close proximity transmission is currently uncertain. However, airborne transmission from person-to-person over long distances is unlikely.

In the Health Care sector the following recommendations are made.

Updated PPE recommendations for the care of patients with known or suspected COVID-19:

  • Based on local and regional situational analysis of PPE supplies, facemasks are an acceptable alternative when the supply chain of respirators cannot meet the demand.  During this time, available respirators should be prioritized for procedures that are likely to generate respiratory aerosols, which would pose the highest exposure risk to HCP.
    • Facemasks protect the wearer from splashes and sprays.
    • Respirators, which filter inspired air, offer respiratory protection.
  • When the supply chain is restored, facilities with a respiratory protection program should return to use of respirators for patients with known or suspected COVID-19. Facilities that do not currently have a respiratory protection program, but care for patients infected with pathogens for which a respirator is recommended, should implement a respiratory protection program.
  • Eye protection, gown, and gloves continue to be recommended.
    • If there are shortages of gowns, they should be prioritized for aerosol-generating procedures, care activities where splashes and sprays are anticipated, and high-contact patient care activities that provide opportunities for transfer of pathogens to the hands and clothing of HCP.

4 Key Factors For Home Health Care Services

Home Health Care Services

Home health care services should emphase the importance of improving life in everyday homes.

Linking with agencies or government services has a distinct impact on the quality of life for the person being cared for at home.

Developing quality care in individual lifes centres around topics of morality and social responsibility.

Nel Noddings who has authored  a book called “Starting At Home”, is one of the central figures in the contemporary discussion of ethics and moral education. Nodding argues that caring is a way of life, learned at home. This can be extended into a guide for social policy.

Tackling issues such as capital punishment, drug treatment, homelessness, mental illness, and abortion, Noddings inverts traditional philosophical priorities to show how an ethics of care can have profound and compelling implications on social and political thought and policy.

I have found this myself. In  caring for a downs son who is now an adult, for 30 years. I have taken the road less travelled and use phylosophical and ethical decisions to assist in improving the quality of care for my son at home.

So many people can impose their views onto a sometimes difficult situation. And yet in the end, I take time to be on my own and make the best ethical decision I can make at the time. Everything else comes secondary to that decision. Sometimes, family member imply that I have made it hard for myself. However, I sleep well at night knowing I am principle focused and not just going with the flow as so many Carers do. 

home health care services

The book “Starting At Home” describes an ideal world by outlining the environment of a loving home and family. The book asks us if we can expand what we have experienced at home into the broader social sphere in the community.

Noddings explores the conflict that characterised political ideology throughout the 20th century between independence and equality. She describes liberalism/independence to all is a problematic way to base social policy. Alternatively, the author believes attentive love in the house contributes to an acceptable reactivity that can be the basis for social policy.

home health care services

The author argues that, with attention on the person who may be socially isolated we can improve quality of life with at homecare given the right social support.

Noddings further notes that the issue of in home health care services should be driven by responsive policies that allow clinicians to adapt appropriately to the needs of many specific but different customers.

Noddings also advises that significant plans for family, career and public life should start in school education.

At home health care services links the connection between treatment for individuals and any debate for moral and social policy. Whilst stressing the significance of improving life in everyday homes, one can influence the potential function that social policy may play in this change.

Quality Of Care At Home

  • Communication

Contact with workers may lead to the problematic actions of certain clients (Hastings & Remington, 1994).

Common features in communication with carers/workers can be included in training and education.

home health care services

Non-verbal and verbal communication skills are used naturally in the home and in a family units.

Communications and communication styles need to be compatable with the client if you are a carer from an agency or family member as the main care giver.

home health care services

Carers and Care workers may not differ in the way they connect at home and/or at work.

 

Care workers and consumers utilise communicative interventions to a great degree.

Some workers have a willingness to utilise expressions, accessible and closed questions effectively other will not.

Eventually, the explanations why workers interact with consumers undoubtedly go beyond employees’ skills and contact knowledge.

Miscommunicartions can occur with auditory impairments, over stating the meanings of communication, and challenges to interpret the nonverbal actions of consumers as a way of connecting with people.

Communication both verbal and non verbal, written and oral, is a vital key to a happy interaction with carers and consumers. Clear communication and use of commonly understood language are integral to meeting
the expectations of all involved.

Good communication, creative thinking, problem-solving, the ability to adapt to people’s needs and a commitment to change are among the skills needed for successful engagement and participation.

Everyone, including staff and mental health consumers and carers engaged to contribute, should feel welcome and at ease to share their expertise. However, the skills it takes to navigate these processes may not come naturally to everyone, and in some cases, may need to be fostered.

For success, everyone involved in the process needs to be inclusive and committed to recognising and developing skills and knowledge. It is not enough to just give people a seat at the table. It takes time to develop trust and understanding in any relationship. The same is to be said for the Carer/consumer relationship.

Transport

Medical appointments, shopping, private, family activities need to continue while caring for your loved one. There is plenty to see. And even if you’ve given up car keys, getting where you need to go should be considerd.

Transportation services ensure secure, timely, and friendly transportation from A to B. It’s more than a pick-up service. Carers can help with getting ready, have some company, and ensure consumers are supported in every possible way.

home health care services

Transportation includes: Doctor’s appointments Shopping / barber appointments / escort to hospital and home pharmacy collection, social family activities. Every ride you take will be an opportunity rather than a chore.

Trusted carer’s supporting the consumer, will have the advantage of a close companionship everywhere you go.

A individual carer can choose when or where a consumer goes too. Medical Alert ID’s can be worn just in case of emergencies.

Motivation.

Lack of motivation can impact negatively on the individual’s participation in recovery or disability. Decreased participation and engagement during rehabilitation greatly influences the level of function gained, length of stay in the hospital, mood and discharge destination.

Motivation is the drive or reason that a patient has to participate in their rehabilitation. However,  motivation levels can be negatively affected by apathy and depression, which are commonly seen in the consumer population.

home health care services

Depression is a mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest.

Apathy is described as “reduced motivation to engage in activities or general lack of initiative”.

Strategies and Interventions For Motivation

There are some strategies and interventions that have been shown to help patients suffering from depression and apathy.

  • Therapeutic Connection

Clinicians can influence motivation through their manner, the level of support they offer to the patient and the level of their involvement as perceived by the patient. Developing rapport with the patient and being genuine in any interaction underpins therapeutic connectivity.

  • Goal-Setting

Motivation is enhanced when there are clear goals which are personally relevant and developed with mutual understanding, negotiation and interaction. Goals and therapy need to be personalised, functional and meaningful. Patients are less motivated if tasks are not meaningful to them. Describing goals using the patient’s language is as important as the development of the goal itself.

home health care services

It has been indicated that listening to music during neural recovery enhances focused attention and verbal memory.

  • Music Therapy

Collectively study findings provide evidence that music engages and facilitates a wide range of cognitive functions. There is indication that listening  to music during neural recovery enhances focused attention and verbal memory. Results were better when music most relevant to the individual was utilised for at least 60 minutes per day.

  • Cognitive Stimulation

    Enhancing perception, attention, comprehension, learning, remembering, problem-solving and reasoning are the goals of cognitive stimulation. Providing opportunities for social interactions with others including family, friends and pets (and incorporating them in their rehabilitation plan) will stimulate cognitive processes.

  • Person-Centred Care Planning

    Acknowledging the patient as a unique individual who is an expert on themselves underpins person-centredness. Providing choices through the provision of information and education may enable them to become more engaged and confident in decision-making processes.

Ascertaining the most likely cause for lack of motivation and disengagement in rehabilitation and recovery should determine the path of the treatment plan and the adoption of most effective interventions. Implementation of appropriate interventions decreases the risk of continued motivational impact on recovery, optimises functional independence and improves the patient’s quality of life post-discharge.

Willingness To Take Responsibility.

When consumers are in institutions, hospitals or group homes, their choice is often severely limited. Choices are made as simple as when to wake up, what to eat, or who to spend your time with. We need to ensure that there is sufficient community housing and resources so that the person in recovery or with a disability can exercise their right to make decisions, take chances, engage in and even succeed in the often frightening and uncertain outside world.

home health care services

Hope is essential to recovery. Every option involves failure or success. Over-protective, limiting opportunities for people, not allowing them to take risks or try new stuff, crushes hope. It can be seen in many individuals long institutionalised or hospitalised. This can also lead to learned helplessness, sometimes more crippling than the disease itself (Petersen, Maier & Seligman, 1995). By promoting risk responsibility and encouraging people to determine and take chances, service providers help combat learned helplessness and foster self-esteem, self-respect, confidence, hope, and recovery.