What Are You On?

What are you on

The phrase “What Are You On” refers to prescribed medications.

It is an significant issue for the global health-care sector. Drug protection is an area of concern and is high-risk.

This post is part of a series of posts relating to taking good care of our health at home. Please read 4 Key Factors For Home Health Care Services if you wish to find out more information about what to expect from care givers.

Maintaining drug safety depends on a variety of factors, errors in assessment, prescribing, dispensation and observations that may lead to adverse effects and harm.

What are you on

Specialists and the health care community are fallible.  The system of health care and drug related services for doctors, health care professionals and health insurance sectors are costly.

Up to 30 per cent of seniors in the United States had a adverse response to their prescribed medication in 2017, according to the American Geriatrics Society. These reactions are most often triggered by skipping doses of medication or inadvertently doubling over drug doses. To avoid these complications and to reduce the risk of adverse reactions with prescription drugs, it is important that seniors establish and sustain a strong drug management programme that will allow them to handle each of their various prescription medicines effectively.

Clearly, medical professionals need to be involved in the research and improvement of drug health, Carers add to this agenda by taking a collective approach to investigating the complexity and protection of prescription control for chronically ill patients.

History.

Few individuals also handle more than one medical condition, a diverse menu of pharmaceutical items and other treatment needs.

What are you on

However, medication protection research to date has concentrated largely on hospital conditions and may have no applicability for home care. For example, unregulated staff, families and unpaid carers receive most healthcare in private homes not planned for such practises.

It is now widely understood that traditional approaches to identify drug-related problems, including labels such as ‘labelless therapy,’ ‘drug-free diagnosis,’ ‘fake medication,’ and ‘false dosage,’ are not acceptable and practical to home care.

Economic , cultural and neighbourhood concerns need to be addressed when evaluating the difficulties associated with medicine. This includes: whether the person can afford to fill the prescription with medication and transportation; anxiety about the side effects; confusion over the purpose, dose or pacing of the drug; and coping with an overwhelmed caregiver with their own health concerns.

It is difficult to provide for any family member who has chronic health problems. Increased number of patients discharged from hospital earlier in recovery process may create uncertainty about new drug regime.

Mobile equipment (i.e., peritoneal and haemodialysis, long-term intravenous catheters, and oxygen / inhalation therapy) has seen a significant rise in home hospital treatment. Both factors, including physical environment, social dynamics, and client and caregiver cognitive and physical skills, must be considered in providing home treatment.

What are you on

Doctors do their utmost to provide the right dosage, but prescription medicines also cause unforeseen reactions. And keeping in good touch with the doctor is smart.

Do not hesitate to call if you think you have an adverse drug reaction or if you are afraid the drugs don’t play together well. The doctor can prescribe another drug or try alternatives to alternative therapies to help you feel better.

Many people are apprehensive about discussing all of their prescription medications with their doctor. Keep in touch with the doctor to make sure the prescription is as safe and effective as the day it was administered.

Many elderly caregivers face their own health issues and can lose sleep as they work almost 24 hours a day. Inside the institutional scenario of carers, there are two to three shifts a day.

Family members and carers often feel a sense of duty in trying to keep the client home without fully understanding that this goal could be unattainable or unrealistic.

Providers work with clients, families and their unpaid caregivers to reduce risks, but the complexity of home environments allows clients and caregivers to routinely exercise independent decision-making in the light of limited professional oversight and often stressed or absent support from home and the community.

In fact, the reporting and communication challenges that are heightened across industries at transition points also raise the potential for inadequate drug resolution and related risks.

However, it is not possible to ignore the vulnerability of home care workers employed mainly without adequate management assistance, and the heterogeneity of each home environment. Consequently, customer service and drug management protection can not be discussed without involving family members, unpaid caregivers and paying providers in the equation.

Our point of view is that the unique life of private homes and communities as well as the various interrelationships between individuals, households, unpaid caregivers and home care staff is a complex socio-ecological issue in terms of healthy handling of drugs.What are you on

Implicit in this perspective of health is the assumption that interactions between human beings and the world are mutual. To elucidate this dynamic relationship, this approach integrates several ideas from machine theory.

Another ecological perspective principle is that people can be represented at multiple aggregation levels in environments: person, family, organisation, society and population.

The need to both explain the multiple levels of problem determinants and recognise opportunities for improvement under this assumption.

Because medicines can interfere poorly with each other, creating a plan for handling medicines does more than just help you stay organised: it also helps you stay healthy.

By knowing which medicines you are taking, you can take responsibility for your own health care and help ensure you remain at low risk for adverse drug interactions.

If prescription medicines are taken properly, they can help us lead happier lives and when you build a medication treatment plan that works for you, it can take a huge stress out of your life and free you up to think about more important things – including spending time with friends and family.

What are you on
What are you on?

If you use a timer and pill dispenser you can not stress about missing your medication. If you get confused about when you take your medication or you feel that there has been a dispensery error please contact the chemist or doctor’s surgery as soon as possible. It is better to be safe than sorry.